捕鱼达人怎么赚钱换现金Good Posture review – Grace Van Patten is a dream in the directorial debut of British actress Dolly Wells

Good Posture (3 stars)

  • Katherine McLaughlin
  • 30 September 2019

Good Posture

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Grace Van Patten is a dream in the directorial debut of British actress Dolly Wells

For her directorial debut, British actress Dolly Wells (recently seen in Can You Ever Forgive Me?) has chosen a character portrait of an entitled twentysomething slacker with parental issues. Set in the Brooklyn area where Wells now lives, adding to the personal touch is that Wells’s best friend, and co-star in their self-penned sitcom Doll & Em, Emily Mortimer, plays reclusive writer Julia Price. Julia’s notable fans include Zadie Smith, Jonathan Ames and Martin Amis, who gamely appear as themselves.

Grace Van Patten (The Meyerowitz Stories) is the protagonist Lilian, who barges into the brownstone home of family friend Julia, after being dumped by her exasperated boyfriend Nate (Gary Richardson). She holes up in a small room there smoking weed, until she is motivated into making a documentary after a run-in with Nate and his new girlfriend, successful filmmaker Laura (Condola Rashad). Lilian’s largely absent music producer father calls in some favours, while she employs incompetent cameraman Sol (John Early – as hilarious as ever).

Wells has crafted a promising first feature that plays out like a gender-flipped version of Noah Baumbach’s 1995 debut Kicking and Screaming, mashed with his more recent collaboration with Greta Gerwig, Mistress America. As Lilian gets to grips with her post-college life and abandonment issues, her cluelessness and arrogance get her into trouble. At the same time, she str电玩城捕鱼现金ikes up a communication with her landlady, via written journal entries, and an affectionate relationship blossoms.

At points, this is a highly amusing and painfully aware depiction of a young woman who has been riding off her good looks and dad’s name for most of her life. Van Patten is a dream as she delivers spiteful and self-centred lines with aplomb. It’s her performance that elevates the material as it detours into side stories that add to the autumnal New York flavour, but rob the film of emotional impact by distracting from the imaginatively drawn mother-daughter dynamic between Lilian and Julia.

Selected release from Fri 4 Oct.

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赢真钱捕鱼棋牌游戏下载安装Clemency review – LFF 2019: Unforgettable death penalty drama featuring mesmerising work from Alfre Woodard

Clemency (5 stars)

  • Nikki Baughan
  • 2 October 2019

Clemency

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LFF 2019: Unforgettable death penalty drama featuring mesmerising work from Alfre Woodard

The debate surrounding America’s death penalty has raged for decades, with myriad documentarians and filmmakers, including Tim Robbins (Dead Man Walking) and Frank Darabont (The Green Mile), exploring the contentio经典捕鱼的现金us issue. With Clemency, writer-director Chinonye Chukwu (alaskaLand) adds her voice to the throng, taking a measured approach which nevertheless speaks angry volumes about the abject inhumanity of this penal policy.

At its centre is an astonishing performance from Alfre Woodard as prison warden Bernadine Williams, who oversees death row inmates in a facility housing predominantly African-American men. She is proud of her career, during which she has witnessed countless executions. Yet the toll is beginning to tell in her closed-off demeanour and strained relationship with husband Jonathan (Wendell Pierce). When Bernadine encounters mild-mannered Anthony Woods (Aldis Hodge), a man sentenced to death for a murder he insists he did not commit, her faith in the justice system begins to fracture.

Bernadine remains poised and professional, even in the face of increased media interest following a botched execution and Woods’ dogged – but also disillusioned – lawyer Marty (Richard Schiff). She is, however, clearly in emotional free-fall. She drinks too much, but never lets her personal demons come to the fore. This is a battle she is determined to fight in private.

Indeed, while performances are strong across the board, Woodard is nothing short of mesmerising. Working from Chukwu’s sensitive screenplay, she captures Bernadine’s churning inner turmoil, not in hysteria or moral soliloquising, but through her resigned expression when comforting the mother of a prisoner, her halting conversations with Jonathan, the raging insomnia which plagues her each night. Chukwu and cinematographer Eric Branco capture this psychological claustrophobia by staying tight on Bernadine – an extended scene in which the camera refuses to look away as she loses herself to silent tears encapsulates Clemency‘s subtle power.

Elsewhere, an evocative score by Kathryn Bostic combines with immersive sound design to emphasise the hard-edged noises of the prison: the slams, the screams, the heartbeat monitors which play out a condemned man’s final moments. These grow in intensity, helping to paint a damning and unforgettable portrait of a woman caught in the machinations of a system which has no time for individuals on either side of the bars, and coming to realise she is a prisoner herself.

Screening on Wed 2, Fri 4 and Fri 11 Oct as part of the BFI London Film Festival 2019. General release TBC.

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好玩的现金捕鱼The Personal History of David Copperfield review

The Personal History of David Copperfield (4 stars)

  • James Mottram
  • 2 October 2019

The Personal History of David Copperfield

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LFF 2019: Armando Iannucci doffs his hat to Dickens with typically amusing results

Stepping away from his satirical roots, Armando Iannucci returns with his third film (following In the Loop and The Death of Stalin), paying homage to the great Victorian novelist Charles Dickens by adapting what many consider to be his masterwork. Acknowledging his personal debt to the writer’s comedic sensibilities, the British filmmaker has already made plain his admiration, in BBC documentary Armando’s Tale of Charles Dickens, and here he does what few Dickens adaptations have managed by bringing out the author’s lighter side.

If the word ‘Dickensian’ has come to signify gloomy workhouses and dire poverty on the streets of London, so Iannucci and his co-writer Simon Blackwell make it their mission to challenge our expectations. Impressively compressing the 600-page novel into a two-hour narrati捕鱼每天送现金ve, this is a sprightly take on Dickens’s account of the life of the ever-optimistic orphan David (Dev Patel), typified by off-kilter transitions between scenes, while Iannucci’s askew humour and eye for eccentric details is deftly intermingled with the author’s own.

True, David must still contend with Uriah Heep (Ben Whishaw), that ‘umble’ sycophant. But there are constant delights to be found in the interpretations of the supporting cast – from David’s batty Aunt Betsey (Tilda Swinton), her sweet but unhinged cousin Mr Dick (Hugh Laurie), and the verbose pauper Mr Micawber (Peter Capaldi), who first gives David shelter after he’s forced by his stepfather to work in a bottling factory in London.

And Iannucci’s casting of Patel is a masterstroke – not because his colour-blind selection may encourage others to follow suit, but because he’s a perfect fit for the role of the innocent, ever-likeable hero. Some Iannucci fans may grumble that the film lacks his usual bite, and perhaps it does, yet, as a breezy and colourful crack at a classic, it smartly straddles the line between appeasing aficionados and enticing newcomers.

Screening on Wed 2, Thu 3 and Sat 5 Oct as part of the BFI London Film Festival 2019. General release from Fri 10 Jan.

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捕鱼送分可退现金电玩Between Two Ferns: The Movie review

Between Two Ferns: The Movie (3 stars)

  • Brian Donaldson
  • 26 September 2019

Between Two Ferns: The Movie

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Patchy affair as Zach Galifianakis’ indie chat show gets the film treatment

Taking Zach Galifianakis’ spoof online talk show out of its short-form comfort zone and into a full-length TV movie always seemed like an idea that couldn’t possibly work. And so, across its 83 minutes, Between Two Ferns‘ true treats are the passive-aggressive celebrity interviews with the likes of Benedict Cumberbatch, Peter Dinklage, Tessa Thompson, Keanu Reeves, Brie Larson and Jon Hamm. Mispronouncing their names, undermining their accomplishments and questioning their talent, Galifianakis is the chat-show host from hell, a sullen presence reading his highly invasive and often inappropriate queries straight from a bit of paper, allowing for zero chemistry to spark between himself and his guests.

Sadly, someone decided that some sort of plot was required to hold this altogether. So, when a catastrophic interview with Matthew McConaughey almost results in the actor drowning after Galifianakis’ efforts to fix a leaky roof, his boss Will Ferrell instructs him to make another ten episodes in two weeks. Succeeding in this task will be followed by a contract offer to make the network show he has always dreamed of helming, while failure means an ultimate expulsion from the Funny Or Die web strand which produces Between Two Ferns.

That an indie star such as Galifianakis would ever want to become the next Jay Leno or David Letterman (another poor schmuck who sits down to take his fern-flavoured medicine) is the gag that’s expected to underpin the road movie sections as his ragtag of helpers come along for the ride fed by an empty promise of some fame and fortune. These scenes merely get in the way of more butt-clenchingly awkward interviews that are clearly be真钱李逵捕鱼下载ing relished by the subjects. That the blooper reel which closes proceedings is the second best part of Between Two Ferns is another indictment on those who worked hard to make this film a ‘story’.

Between Two Ferns: The Movie is available now on Netflix.

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有没有现金捕鱼游戏Judy review – Renée Zellweger is tremendous as tragic icon Judy Garland in this look at her later life

Judy (4 stars)

  • Anna Smith
  • 30 September 2019

Judy

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Renée Zellweger is tremendous as tragic icon Judy Garland in this look at her later lif现金版捕鱼大师e

Judy Garland died in 1969 at the age of 47. Also that year, she married her fifth husband and performed a five-week run in a London nightclub. This biopic takes a look at that time, with Renée Zellweger on top form as the pill-popping singer, indelibly marked by her experiences as a child actress in the likes of The Wizard of Oz. It’s a sad indictment of the early days of Hollywood, but director Rupert Goold (True Story) still finds plenty of joy, glamour and heart in this adaptation of the hit play End of the Rainbow.

We meet Judy when she is divorcing husband number four, and encounters handsome young Mickey Deans (Finn Wittrock) at a party. He follows her to London, but this is less focused on their romance and more on her struggles to complete her work commitments while drifting drunkenly from hotels to bars, adored but unhappy and wracked with guilt about being separated from her children.

This is a portrait of a deeply lonely woman, and its best scenes are both poignant and gently amusing. One adorable moment sees the star inviting a pair of startled gay autograph hunters out to dinner, only to end up at their small flat when all restaurants are shut. A tender conversation ensues, recalling My Week with Marilyn in its depiction of an ill-fated actress having an encounter with a British fan.

This also recalls the recent Stan & Ollie, but it’s better, not least due to Zellweger’s tremendous performance. Whether she’s delivering fake smiles or – more rarely – real ones, Zellweger is captivating as the tragic star, her face etched with sadness, her eyes wistful, her shoulders slightly hunched, her stagger barely under control. This seems like the role the actress has been waiting for – and the film many Garland fans have too.

General release from Wed 2 Oct.

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用现金玩的捕鱼游戏Werewolf review – Thoughtful WWII thriller focusing on a group of young concentration camp survivors

Werewolf (4 stars)

  • Allan Hunter
  • 30 September 2019

Werewolf

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Thoughtful WWII thriller focusing on a group of young concentration camp survivors

The horror of war doesn’t end with liberation in Werewolf, an intense, imaginative mixture of thriller, fairytale and allegory from Polish writer-director Adrian Panek. There are strong echoes of Lord of the Flies and the Sam Fuller classic White Dog in a story that follows a group of children struggling to survive in the dying weeks of the Second World War.

Survivors of a concentration camp, the band of children find sanctuary in a remote woodland mansion. There is little food, no water or electricity but there is a fragile sense of security. Hanka (Sonia Mietielica) becomes the reluctant leader – a Snow White forced to create a home for her own version of the seven dwarfs. Hanka tries to keep order and restore some vestige of civilised values to the group. The children are encouraged to use cutlery rather than grab for scraps with their hands.

The threat to their safety stretches from Russian soldiers to fugitive Nazis and eventually a pack of vicious German shepherd attack dogs, once at the command of concentration camp officers. The dogs surround the house, leaving the children with little chance of escape.

Panek makes the most of his locations, contrasting the gloom and claustrophobia of the house wit多玩捕鱼真钱版下载h the seemingly boundless freedom of the woods. There are tense moments of changing allegiances, lucky escapes and growing tensions between Hanys (Nicolas Przygoda) and traumatised loner Wladek (Kamil Polnisiak), as they compete to impress or befriend Hanka.

Restrained in its depiction of violence and bloodshed, Werewolf provides a thoughtful, sensitive exploration of how humanity endures in the face of such evil. The dogs have been trained to kill. Many of the children have only known a society in which the strong survive and the weak perish. How can compassion hope to flourish in a world gone mad?

Selected release from Fri 4 Oct.

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电玩城捕鱼现金下分The Report review – LFF 2019: Adam Driver stars in this somewhat dry indictment of the CIA’s post 9/11 practices

The Report (3 stars)

  • Sophie Willard
  • 4 October 2019

The Report

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LFF 2019: Adam Driver stars in this somewhat dry indictment of the CIA’s post 9/11 practices

In this damning if flat indictment of CIA practices, Adam Driver plays Daniel Jones, a former US Se捕鱼赢现金排行榜nate investigator and the lead author of a report on the agency’s torture programme deployed in the wake of 9/11, which was commissioned by Senator Dianne Feinstein (Annette Bening). Jones faced stonewalling, obfuscation, and the threat of legal action as the CIA attempted to prevent the report’s publication – despite its findings corroborating their own, from an earlier, covert investigation.

Those findings? That torture – repackaged with PR spin as ‘enhanced interrogation techniques’ – produced no actionable intelligence. Writer-director Scott Z Burns’ film hammers this conclusion home decisively. Although focusing primarily on the practices of the Bush administration, notably, and refreshingly, his script doesn’t let President Obama off lightly either, exposing the Democrat party’s complicity in sweeping the story under the rug.

Grainy, orange-filtered flashbacks to the events detailed in the documents recreate the dehumanising treatment of detainees. They’re the film’s weakest element. Dialogue between CIA agents and the incompetent US Air Force psychologists who devised the programme is almost laughably expository, their conversations too on-the-nose in their cartoonish villainy. Though the flashbacks don’t glorify the violence, they serve little purpose but to humiliate the Middle Eastern actors employed to stand naked and chained and pretend to be repeatedly water-boarded – an insulting creative decision.

Rather dry in its first half, the film injects much-needed humour into later scenes, with Driver in particular making use of his fine comic timing. Bening, sadly, has little to work with, and the attention to story over character results in a fact-focused retelling that’s intellectually interesting and thrilling in its condemnation, yet devoid of tension, drama, and emotion.

Screening on Sat 5 and Sun 6 Oct as part of the BFI London Film Festival 2019. Selected release from Fri 15 Nov.

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捕鱼专场领万元现金The King review – LFF 2019: David Michôd is behind this ambitious but uneven take on the Henriad plays

The King (3 stars)

  • Katherine McLaughlin
  • 3 October 2019

The King

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LFF 2019: David Michôd is behind this ambitious but uneven take on the Henriad plays

With 2010’s Animal Kingdom, Australian director David Michôd announced himself as a bold new voice, picking apart anger and masculinity with a palpable intensity. That film also provided Ben Mendelsohn with his international breakthrough, and he briefly appears as Henry IV in the director’s latest, an ambitious reworking of William Shakespeare’s Henriad plays. Beginning at the end of Henry IV’s life, this adaptation concludes with events just after the Battle of Agincourt.

The protagonist is Henry V, played by young heartthrob Timothée Chalamet. He shows impressive range as reluctant ruler ‘Hal’, who cedes his playboy lifestyle when he takes the throne. He is eventually provoked into waging war with The Dauphin of France (Robert Pattinson), despite leaning towards pacifism. Joel Edgerton, who co-wrote the screenplay with Michôd, plays John Falstaff with a little nod to Orson Welles’s turn in Chimes at Midnight but he makes the role his own as the film progresses, his tormented soldier a mix of amusingly gruff and genuinely affecting.

When Pattinson appears on screen, doing an awful French accent that he may have learnt from watching John Malkovich’s turn as Pascal Sauvage in Johnny English, things take a turn for the worse. His comical role is about as nuanced as Malkovich’s, and thus memorable for all the wrong reasons. Considering the giant fandoms Pattinson and Chalamet have amassed, it’s tempting to read their squabbles in the dirt as comment on their shifting sex symbol statuses. At any rate, it feels like stunt casting.

Michôd fails to draw out the anguish of his young monarch’s coming-of-age in a brutal setting with as much vigour as his debut. What he does achieve, however, is an intermittently compelling treatise on the consequences of war, as he examines the way Hal gets swallowed up in its machinations, despite his best efforts. The superbly directed mud-and-guts battle at Agincourt speaks volumes on the savagery of conflict, even if the overall film strikes a disappointingly uneven tone.

Screening on Thu 3, Fri 4 and Sun 6 Oct as part of the BFI London Film Festival 2019. Selected cinematic release from Fri 11 Oct and on Netfl手机现金捕鱼平台宝马棋牌ix from Fri 1 Nov.

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捕鱼大师现金pc版Africa in Motion continues its mission to introduce Scottish audiences to the brilliance of African cinema

Africa in Motion continues its mission to introduce Scottish audiences to the brilliance of African cinema

  • Arusa Qureshi
  • 3 October 2019

Africa in Motion continues its mission to introduce Scottish audiences to the brilliance of African cinema

Sew the Winter to My Skin

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As the annual film festival returns for its 14th year, we explore some of this year’s highlights

Scotland’s major celebration of African cinema is back for its 14th edition, presenting audiences in Glasgow and Edinburgh with a range of stories from the African continent and beyond. From documentaries right the way through to coming-of-age dramas, Africa in Motion has screened over 600 films since its inception in 2捕鱼现金20块钱起充006, continuing to highlight the diversity and talent within African cinema with each year’s programme.

The 2019 edition of the festival is no exception, with screenings, discussions, Q&As, pop-ups, workshops, exhibitions, live performances and much more taking place over the nine days. As far as the festival’s acclaimed curation goes, Africa in Motion has been working to develop a unique approach in recent years, which has resulted in this year’s programme featuring a team of 14 paid curators, all People of Colour (PoC), coming from Scotland, Morocco, Brazil, Cameroon and Rwanda, each contributing to the programme in various ways. The significance of this lies in its truly collaborative spirit, which means that the programme is able to cater to an array of audiences thanks in part to the varying perspectives and viewpoints of the curators themselves.

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最新现金捕鱼斗地主Document Human Rights Film Festival announces 2019 programme

Document Human Rights Film Festival announces 2019 programme

  • Julia Kajdi
  • 4 October 2019

Document Human Rights Film Festival Announces 2019 Festival Programme

Honeyland

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Glasgow film 现金上下分捕鱼游戏festival returns with another remarkable line-up of events

Document Human Rights Film Festival is back, running from Sun 24–Wed 27 October at the CCA with premieres, short films, panel discussions, live performances, seminars and a special club night event with director and DJ Rita Maia.

Since 2003, the festival has featured over 600 films, offering a platform for national and international independent documentary filmmakers to let their voices be heard. The festival is devoted to bringing the best in recent human rights films to audiences each year. As a member of the Human Rights Films Network, the event covers various topics and themes including women, racism, human trafficking, education, mental health, disability, social care, immigration and LGBTQA+ rights – just to mention a few. In 2019 – designated as the Year of Indigenous Languages by the UN – the festival focuses on Indigenous people and their struggles as well as showcasing pieces dealing with climate change and environmental crisis, questioning the collective responsibility of documentary filmmakers.

As Sean Greenhorn from Screen Scotland summarises: ‘Across four days Document Human Rights Human Film Festival provides a vital platform to shed light on underrepresented communities from across the globe, using the format of documentary to amplify their voices to audiences in Scotland.’

Opening the four-day-long festival, Jay Bernard’s Surge is a delicate mixture of poetry and archive films about a 1981 New Cross fire that resulted in 13 African-American people dying. The line-up also includes Ai Weiwei’s The Rest, centred on a small group of refugees and their disappointment in Western liberalism and its social systems; Elke Margarete Lehrenkrauss’ Lovemobil, introducing the difficult lives of sex workers and their lack of rights; Camila Freitas’ Chão, documenting Brazilian workers’ fight for land and land reform; and the Scottish premiere of Susana de Sousa Dias’ Fordlandia Malaise, which explores the abandoned factory in the Amazon that was built in 1928 as part of Henry Ford’s idea to industrialise the region.

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